News

Yesterday a hearing took place at the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights on the case of Khamtokhu and Aksenchik v Russia in which the Court will decide whether two men convicted of crimes in Russia have been victims of gender and age discrimination, due to legislation which allows life sentences to be given only to men between the ages of 18 and 65.

On 18 April, the Global Citizenship Commission (GCC) presented to the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Ban Ki-moon, the findings of its report on updating and implementing the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) for the world as it is today. Our Executive Director, Dimitrina Petrova, submitted a contribution on equality rights used in the compilation of the report, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in the 21st Century.

In the latest volume of our Equal Rights Review – an interdisciplinary journal offering analysis, insight and ideas to promote equality – the Equal Rights Trust spoke with two experts to discuss intersectionality and its contribution to advancing equality. Below is an extract from this interview.

The Equal Rights Trust has published volume sixteen of its biannual Equal Rights Review, an interdisciplinary journal offering analysis, insight and ideas to those promoting equality. This issue has a special focus on intersectionality. It asks how relevant - if at all - intersectionality is for understanding and fighting discrimination.

We particularly recommend the interview with experts, Professor Kimberlé Crenshaw (who coined the term intersectionality in the late 1980s) and CEDAW member, Patricia Schulz. We are also delighted that Rohingya activist, Wai Wai Nu participated in volume 16, giving her testimony on the intersection of discrimination she experienced as both a woman and a Rohingya living in Myanmar

To read the complete volume [click here] or select individual items below.

Since 2010, the Equal Rights Trust has supported Journalists for Human Rights (JHR) Network, the only platform of its kind which provides an essential means for journalists to report safely and effectively on hate speech, discrimination and violations of freedom of expression in Sudan and South Sudan. During this time, the Trust has helped the network to develop from an informal group of a few like-minded journalists in Sudan to a network of more than 300 members, friends and associates working in both countries.

The Equal Rights Trust has launched a campaign to support funded internship and fellowship placements for equality advocates at the start of their careers.  

The human rights charity sector is notoriously competitive and routinely demands some form of initial job experience, which is usually unpaid. Through the Bob Hepple Memorial Fund we are levelling the playing field, giving those without the financial means to work for free the opportunity to enter the sector and fulfil their ambition.

Read Dimitrina Petrova's guest column for JURIST, where she discusses the need to reduce inequality as a development goal in order to reach a prime Sustainable Development Goal.

A new report published today by the Equal Rights Trust exposes the extent of discrimination and inequality experienced by groups including women; persons with disabilities; lesbian, gay and bisexual persons; and persons living with HIV in Solomon Islands.

On 2 December 2015, the Supreme Court of Appeal of South Africa held in Minister of Basic Education v Basic Education for All that the failure of the Department of Basic Education (DBE) to provide free textbooks to all students in the Limpopo province breached the constitutional guarantees of equality, human dignity, and the right to a basic education.

Today, on the occasion of Human Rights Day the Equal Rights Trust has launched My Children’s Future, a film which highlights the devastating consequences of laws implemented in 27 countries which deny women the ability to pass on nationality to their children.

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